The Book of Deadly Animals

The Book of Deadly Animals

Dangers lurk on a walk in the woods or a swim in the ocean, writes Gordon Grice: “… no matter how much we may love them, wild animals are not our friends.”
Nature, Grice asserts, is surprisingly scary, or surprisingly natural. We know that sharks, coyotes and wolves are dangerous — although much of our “knowledge” is myth compounded by hearsay. More »

The 4% Universe

The 4% Universe

If many scientific quests should be marked with an academic form of caution tape: “Progress = 2 steps forward + step back,” cosmologists have been in steady retreat for decades. The “cosmo” girls (and mainly boys) who explore the origin and fate of the universe were once mocked as data-free arm wavers. Then, in 1964, cosmo was promoted into a science by the discovery that echoes of the Big Bang were rattling around the universe. More »

The Poisoner’s Handbook

The Poisoner's Handbook

Could good come from a wave of poisonings eight decades ago? Yes, argues Deborah Blum, in a quick, entertaining read that, for better not worse, does not teach exactly what the title promises. Rather than a handbook for agents of arsenic or quaffers of chloroform, the book instead shows how a scientific establishment grew up to detect poison and deter poisoners. More »

Giant snake invasion!

Giant snake invasion!

Pythons, anacondas and boas are breeding in South Florida. What are these snakes eating, besides alligators? Can they be trapped, hunted, poisoned? More »